Tuesday, November 13, 2018

WHAT EVER HAPPENED...? "Tributes..."



TRIBUTES AND THANKS FROM MY STUDENTS AND THEIR PARENTS

[These are as written, except with some names abbreviated.]

Dear Ms. Schliff,
My wife and I would like to thank you for the wonderful work you and the BOCES staff at Lenape have accomplished with J. over the past five years. We only hope that his next teacher will be as diligent with him as you have been.
The job of teacher is hard enough, but it takes a “special person” to be a special ed. teacher, and we are and have been always thankful that you were that special person and teacher for our special son.
God bless you.
Sincerely,
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. [parents]
P.S. We will keep you updated on J.’s progress and let him write often, if he does not see you.

***                                            
                                                                      6/98
Dear Janet,
We want to thank you for all your hard work, dedication, and caring that you have done. You are an outstanding teacher and we have greatly appreciated your going above and beyond your basic duties! Danielle has truly benefited from being in your class. We can only hope to have her with a teacher 1/2 as good as you. Danielle and the rest of us will miss you – thank you.
Love,
Doreen and Gary [parents]

***

Just thought I’d pass this along: I was talking about B. with his mom, A., and she said you are the best teacher he has ever had! We are not the only ones who feel that way about you. We will MISS YOU.
Doreen [parent]
***
Thank you for being a wonderful teacher and person to B.
You’re welcome about basket and really you deserve so much more.
If his next teacher is 1/2 teacher you are, I’ll count my blessings!!!
The F. Family [parent]
***
6/20/04
Dear Janet,
Roses are red and violets are blue, and sugar is sweet and so are you. Keep on smiling. You make us all happy, and now we don’t have you for a teacher, and it’s time to let go, and it’s time to cry and to say good-bye to a wonderful teacher to have for six years, and you sure will be missed, with tears or cries to say good-bye, but stay as sweet and kind, and we hope other kids will see it the same way we do. It’s hard to say good-bye without a tear, but we need to move on, and it sure won’t be the same.
If no one can see how sweet and kind you are, then they are missing out on a friend, not only a teacher, but one who cares about what you do, as a sweet teacher that you always will be. So did you shed a tear? And please don’t forget us.
Love always,
The Y. Family [parents]
Bye, bye, bye

***
                                                                      6/2/04

Dear Ms. Schliff,
          Hi! I’m really glad that I found time to write a letter to you before the end of the year. I’ve been so really glad that you have been my teacher for the past Six years.
          I have learned so much from you and the other teacher between better behavier and health to reading writeing and other classes. this is why when I go on to the High School I will miss seeing you in class every day, but I will never forget you and you will never me.
                                                                      Your friend,
                                                                      R. [student]

***
June 2005
Dear Ms. Schliff,                                          
I an glad you are my techer and you are the best techer in the hole world and you helpt me with everything this year
                                                                      Love,
S. [student]
***
          Hi, we had a great time last night. Your classroom is such a fun and positive place for kids to be! Thanks so much! Have a great day.
                                                                      R. [parent]  


***

                                                                      September 2002
I was very impressed with how you worked with the kids this morning. We’re very glad to have Erick with you another year!
                                                                      Walter [parent]
 “We can’t have a party for Erick without Ms. Schliff,” Erick’s mom, Clara, said at his 30th birthday party, in July 2017, to which I was invited and enjoyed attending.

***
2005
“A. was scared at first meeting his new school teacher, you, but he enjoyed the year at the best school and teacher. Have a great summer.”
                              R. [parent]

***
2004
“I just want to say J. answered every question on the [Christopher Columbus] study guide correctly on the first try! This certainly is a testament to the info he is receiving in school, and how well he is retaining it!”
                                                                      J. [parent]

***
[Christmas card] 2006
“Every holiday, I thank God for the help you gave my son, and you know I will never forget you. Thanks.”
                                                                      N.  [parent]

***



I (Douglas Winslow Cooper) have been excerpting, weekly, material from this almost-final version of the fine book by Janet Johnson Schliff, M.S. Ed., which she wrote over a three-year period with some coaching and editing help from me, through my business, Write Your Book with Me.

Her memoir is now available in paperback and ebook formats from Outskirts Press  and amazon.com

What Ever Happened to My White Picket Fence? My Brain Injury from My Massive Brain Tumor



                                              ###

BOOK TALKS AND SIGNINGS



Janet Johnson Schliff spoke at the Oblong Books Bookstore in Rhinebeck, NY, on Tuesday, February 6 at 6 p.m.

Janet was on WKNY Radio 1490 in Kingston, NY, on Thursday, March 1 at 9:10 a.m. 

Janet spoke at Barnes & Noble in Kingston, NY, on Saturday, March 3 at 1 p.m. 

Janet spoke at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on March 6 
at 7 p.m. 

Janet spoke at the Golden Notebook Bookstore in Woodstock, NY, on March 17 at 2 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Morton Library in Rhinecliff, NY, on March 28 at 6:30 p.m. 

Janet spoke at RCAL in Kingston, NY, on April 3 at 4 p.m. [They gave her an impromptu book-launch party.]

Janet spoke at the Parkinson's Support Group at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on April 4 at 2:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Stone Ridge Library in Stone Ridge, NY, on April 27 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Hurley Library in Hurley, NY, on May 4 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Kingston Library in Kingston, NY, on May 9 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Staatsburg Library in Staatsburg, NY, on May 14 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Clinton Community Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on May 31 at 6:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Mountain Top Library in Tannersville, NY, on June 9 at noon.

Janet spoke at the Gardiner Library in Gardiner, NY, on June 11 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Marbletown Community Center in Stone Ridge, NY, on June 20 at 6 p.m.

Janet was interviewed on radio station WTBQ-FM (93.5) on June 29 at 12 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Esopus Library in Port Ewen, NY, on July 13 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Pine Plains Library in Pine Plains, NY, on July 20 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Ulster Library in Kingston, NY, on July 23 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Northern Dutchess Bible Church in Red Hook, NY, on August 11 at 1 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Inquiring Minds Bookstore in New Paltz, NY, on September 6 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Adriance Library in Poughkeepsie, NY, on September 15 at 2:30 p.m.

Janet was interviewed on radio station WRIP-FM (97.9) on September 21 at 8 a.m.

Janet again spoke at the Mountain Top Library in Tannersville, NY, on September 22 at noon.

Janet spoke at the Enchanted Cafe in Red Hook, NY, on September 28 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Hyde Park Library in Hyde Park, NY, on October 4 at 7 p.m.

Janet participated in an Author Weekend at the Barnes & Noble in Poughkeepsie, NY, on October 14 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Tivoli Library in Tivoli, NY, on October 22 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet’s interview for the TV program Wake Up with Marci on the You Too America Channel aired on Monday, November 5, and Friday, November 9. It can now be found on the Internet.

Janet spoke at the Germantown Library in Germantown, NY, on November 7 at 6:00 p.m.


More signings will be coming up. A fine feature about Janet by John DeSantos [845 LIFE] appeared in the Middletown Times Herald-Record on Monday, March 12, as part of Brain Injury Awareness Month. An article about her book was just published in the May 2018 Living Rhinebeck Magazine. An article about her book appeared in the May 14 Daily Freeman of Kingston, NY. and another in the Family Life section of the Poughkeepsie Journal on June 8th. The Millerton News published an article on Thursday, August 2, about her talk at the Pine Plains Library. 





Sunday, November 11, 2018

MANAGE NURSING CARE AT HOME, Why?



CHAPTER 1 WHY HOME, NOT A NURSING HOME, OR HOSPICE?


Why would your patient rather be at home? The people, places, and things are familiar.  It’s comfortable. Why do you want to care for the patient at home? You want to be together. You distrust care given by others, especially at a distance. In some cases, home care is less expensive.

In a nursing home, there is a community of patients, some whom your patient would like and some less attractive. There are schedules with limited flexibility and personnel with limited time to provide care.  The nursing home is generally at a significant distance from the patient’s friends and family, inhibiting visiting and monitoring the care, as will the rules of the facility. Physicians may visit, reducing the need to travel, a plus.

In a hospice, it is acknowledged that the illness is terminal, and the goal is patient comfort, an advantage. However, some families and some patients may well not want to accept this prognosis, and there is always a concern that being labeled as “terminal” may lead to receiving poorer care.

Home care can be a blessing. As written about my [DWC’s] wife’s situation seven years after choosing to be home rather than in a hospice (Cooper, 2011):
“…Tina was very fragile when she first came home. Her needs were many --- ventilator-dependent, unable to speak, tube-fed, unable to eat or drink by mouth; physical therapy to keep her joints pliable, causing pain no matter how gently it was done, and medication being given on schedule day and night, interrupting the little sleep she was able to find amidst all the new noises and activity in her room.

         While her body remained fragile, Tina’s spirit grew strong. (Her complaining consisted of a frown on her face.) She withstood the changes in her health condition with the attention she received from the nurses, each one caring for her as a friend as well as a patient." [Terry Bush, LPN.]
 
She’s been home for seven years since then. Through my IBM retirees’ medical benefits, we have had round-the-clock nursing, first through an agency and then from nurses we have obtained on our own. Most of our nurses have been with us for years, as Tina is a cooperative and cheerful patient, always appreciative of the care she receives. Here, "TLC" is "Tina-Loving Care."  There have been some scary times, including several bouts of pneumonia, and many trips to the doctor in our special van. There have also been lovely times. We say, “every day is a blessing.”  Every day is Valentine’s Day….

Tina still cares about her friends, her family, her nurses, keeps up with the news, and relishes the documentary and music channels on TV. She chats on the phone, spends an hour or two out of bed in her wheelchair daily, and provides an inspiration to those who know her. She is our heroine.

Now, 2016, five years after that was written, Tina’s condition is somewhat worse, with significant losses in cognition and ability to communicate, but she still usually indicates she enjoys her life, and we are still happy that she continues to be with us.

                                                  ###


Contact information:
Diane R. Beggin, RN
40 Sycamore Drive
Montgomery, NY 12549
http://managenursingcareathome.com


                                    ###

Available from Outskirts Press and from Amazon:

How to Manage Nursing Care at Home


IN MEMORIAM: ROBERT F. STARBUCK, USMC



Robert F. Starbuck died a hero in Vietnam on February 4, 1967.  Only 25, he was a sergeant of an elite RECON Marine detachment holding a hill against overwhelming odds.  He was awarded the Silver Star, one of our armed forces’ highest decorations for bravery.

Bob and I were football teammates, high school classmates, and friends. He was very likeable and decent.  His death must have been shattering to his family. When I learned, much later than 1967, of his death, I pondered what I could do in his memory. Moving back to Walden, NY, I found that our high school, Valley Central, held an annual awards ceremony for members of the athletic teams. I established the Robert F. Starbuck Captain’s Award in his honor, going each year to the captain of the football team, in recognition of Bob’s leadership, courage, strength, and service to our country.

Recently, a memorial ceremony was held in honor of our local servicemen who died. There is never enough we can do to thank such people.

The story of Bob’s last battle is one of those in the book, Honor the Warrior: the United States Marine Corps in Vietnam, by William L. Myers, published in 2000. Mr. Myers dedicates his book to the nearly 15,000 members of the U.S. Marine Corps who died in Viet Nam. His dedication includes this excerpt from a poem by Laurence Binyon:

          But they shall not grow old
          As we who are left grow old.
          Age will not weary them nor the years condemn,
          But at the going down of the sun and in the morning
          We will remember them.

We do remember.



Thursday, November 8, 2018

WHAT EVER HAPPENED...? "Danielle and Catherine," Down Syndrome


And speaking about our society becoming nicer to one another, here’s a chapter about two people who do just that….

Danielle was a little girl when I first taught her at Ulster County BOCES in my special ed. Life Skills classroom. She has Down syndrome and she has been an absolute joy in my life to this day!

When she was in my class, she paid attention and followed the rules – most of the time. Sometimes, I had to send her to “time out” to pull herself together.

Classroom work was hard for all of my students. One day when Danielle was particularly stressed out, she asked if she could take a break from her math worksheet. I said she could, and I turned on the radio for music to calm her. The radio station was playing “Build Me Up Buttercup,” sung by The Foundations. Danielle just got up and danced. When others saw her, some of them danced, too. They all stopped working for the three minutes the song played.

After the song ended, I turned off the radio, and Danielle, and all the other students, went straight back to work without me telling them to. I decided right there and then that this song would be ours forever to help us calm down about our struggles.

I went to the store and bought that song and had it available each day for the rest of my teaching career. Each new year, I explained to the students about a former student, Danielle, who got that idea started. Many classes years after that had a three-minute “buttercup break” so they could chill out and then get back to work.

Danielle invited me to her 30th birthday party that she held in a nice restaurant with lots of guests, some of them students in classes from way-back-when with her. I asked the DJ to play that song and a couple of others that my students used in my classroom all those years ago. We all danced at her party, and I cried happy tears on the dance floor, remembering when they all were small. Now they’re all adults, and I LOVE being around them.

A bunch of former students went out to lunch with my then-boyfriend Aiden and me once or twice a year. When I first got out of the hospital after my brain surgery, we met a lot more often. But nowadays I have less time because of all the other things I’m involved in to get better: support groups, holistic/alternative therapies, church functions, etc.

One of the “lunch buddies” is Catherine, another student whom I taught a long time ago. Catherine also has Down syndrome and has remained friends with Danielle all through their adulthood.

Catherine leaves hysterically funny messages for me nowadays on my answering machine. It’s almost like she has radar for detecting my bad days from far away and calls. When I get home feeling terrible about one more embarrassing meltdown somewhere, Catherine is on my machine, and her words make me laugh and momentarily forget the nonsense that took place that day.

Throughout my career, I taught many students with various disabilities. The population that I feel I was the most effective with was the Life Skills students. The fact that I am still in contact with some of them over 20 years later supports that point. [I still love the time I spend with Danielle, Catherine, and Erick and their families. I love their stories from our classroom long ago.]

The time I spend with these “kids” of mine is truly a blessing. They are the sweetest people I know!



From IN FOCUS, FALL 1997, Ulster BOCES Special/Alternative Education Programs Newsletter:

Two Young Olympians Take Home the Gold in Friendship
New Paltz - After competing against approximately 50 adult competitors, two young female contestants were presented with bronze medals in the annual Special Olympic softball competition held this fall at Cantine Field in Saugerties.

Catherine, 10, from Lenape Elementary School and Danielle, 13, a student in the Ulster BOCES Special Education program at Lenape, both accompanied the torch and helped carry the Ulster BOCES banner during the opening ceremony of the Special Olympics. The students then went on to place in the contest, which evaluated batting, fielding, base running and throwing skills.

Janet Schliff, an Ulster BOCES special education teacher at Lenape Elementary, coordinated the event. Rich Smith, coach for the summer school program and a summer school teacher at Ulster BOCES, was responsible for training both girls for the competition. Candice Goldstein, speech therapist for the New Paltz school district, was also on hand to lend support to the competitors.

United by their victory at the games, these two students are also friends who met in Ruth Backenroth’s special education classroom a few years ago. Although Catherine is now a student in a New Paltz inclusion class, the girls’ friendship remains strong. The opportunity for friendships between Ulster BOCES students and New Paltz students is encouraged by the design of the integration of the Special Education program at the Lenape school. Interacting with one another on a daily basis, Ulster BOCES and New Paltz students have lunch together, share the playground and library, and are mainstreamed for music, art, and gym classes.
Among the many benefits of mainstreaming and integration are that Ulster BOCES students get out of the small settings of 1:12:1 or 1:6:1 [teacher:students:staff] and become part of a larger group where they can learn socialization skills. Also, the Lenape Elementary school students learn diversity and acceptance. Ulster BOCES special education teacher, Janet Schliff, summed it up by saying, “It doesn’t matter what you look like on the outside, it is who you are on the inside that counts.”

The girls’ parents also help nurture their friendship by making arrangements for the girls to play together regularly. Catherine and Danielle call their time together the “Friendship Club.” Weekly, their play time together is planned to include coloring, exercise, and even making applesauce. Asked to describe their favorite joint activity, the girls simultaneously sang out, “Eating pizza.” The girls also shared their thoughts about each other. Giggling, Catherine explained her appreciation for Danielle’s sense of humor, “She’s so funny, she always makes me laugh.” Danielle credits Catherine’s helpful nature as her best quality, “She even helps me clean my room!”

[This article was written long ago, but I saved it because Special Olympics is very dear to my heart. Here and elsewhere, I have used the children’s names only when I have had parental permission.]



    So, to end this wonderful chapter, I need to tell you what Danielle said to me when I told her that Aiden and I broke up: “That’s men for you.”

     She couldn’t have said it better!



I (Douglas Winslow Cooper) have been excerpting, weekly, material from this almost-final version of the fine book by Janet Johnson Schliff, M.S. Ed., which she wrote over a three-year period with some coaching and editing help from me, through my business, Write Your Book with Me.

Her memoir is now available in paperback and ebook formats from Outskirts Press  and amazon.com

What Ever Happened to My White Picket Fence? My Brain Injury from My Massive Brain Tumor



                                              ###

BOOK TALKS AND SIGNINGS



Janet Johnson Schliff spoke at the Oblong Books Bookstore in Rhinebeck, NY, on Tuesday, February 6 at 6 p.m.

Janet was on WKNY Radio 1490 in Kingston, NY, on Thursday, March 1 at 9:10 a.m. 

Janet spoke at Barnes & Noble in Kingston, NY, on Saturday, March 3 at 1 p.m. 

Janet spoke at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on March 6 
at 7 p.m. 

Janet spoke at the Golden Notebook Bookstore in Woodstock, NY, on March 17 at 2 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Morton Library in Rhinecliff, NY, on March 28 at 6:30 p.m. 

Janet spoke at RCAL in Kingston, NY, on April 3 at 4 p.m. [They gave her an impromptu book-launch party.]

Janet spoke at the Parkinson's Support Group at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on April 4 at 2:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Stone Ridge Library in Stone Ridge, NY, on April 27 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Hurley Library in Hurley, NY, on May 4 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Kingston Library in Kingston, NY, on May 9 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Staatsburg Library in Staatsburg, NY, on May 14 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Clinton Community Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on May 31 at 6:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Mountain Top Library in Tannersville, NY, on June 9 at noon.

Janet spoke at the Gardiner Library in Gardiner, NY, on June 11 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Marbletown Community Center in Stone Ridge, NY, on June 20 at 6 p.m.

Janet was interviewed on radio station WTBQ-FM (93.5) on June 29 at 12 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Esopus Library in Port Ewen, NY, on July 13 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Pine Plains Library in Pine Plains, NY, on July 20 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Ulster Library in Kingston, NY, on July 23 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Northern Dutchess Bible Church in Red Hook, NY, on August 11 at 1 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Inquiring Minds Bookstore in New Paltz, NY, on September 6 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Adriance Library in Poughkeepsie, NY, on September 15 at 2:30 p.m.

Janet was interviewed on radio station WRIP-FM (97.9) on September 21 at 8 a.m.

Janet again spoke at the Mountain Top Library in Tannersville, NY, on September 22 at noon.

Janet spoke at the Enchanted Cafe in Red Hook, NY, on September 28 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Hyde Park Library in Hyde Park, NY, on October 4 at 7 p.m.

Janet participated in an Author Weekend at the Barnes & Noble in Poughkeepsie, NY, on October 14 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Tivoli Library in Tivoli, NY, on October 22 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet’s interview for the TV program Wake Up with Marci on the You Too America Channel was scheduled to air on Monday, November 5, and Friday, November 9.

Janet spoke at the Germantown Library in Germantown, NY, on November 7 at 6:00 p.m.


More signings will be coming up. A fine feature about Janet by John DeSantos [845 LIFE] appeared in the Middletown Times Herald-Record on Monday, March 12, as part of Brain Injury Awareness Month. An article about her book was just published in the May 2018 Living Rhinebeck Magazine. An article about her book appeared in the May 14 Daily Freeman of Kingston, NY. and another in the Family Life section of the Poughkeepsie Journal on June 8th. The Millerton News published an article on Thursday, August 2, about her talk at the Pine Plains Library. 





Saturday, November 3, 2018

MANAGE NURSING CARE...Home from the Hospital

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

Why choose home care rather than care at a nursing facility?
Where in your home?
What will you need?
When will who have to do what?
Who will you hire?
How will you manage the care?

OUR PROMISE

You will learn from our experience how to prepare for the homecoming of your patient and how to manage nursing care at home thereafter.

YOUR OPPORTUNITY AND RESPONSIBILITY

Providing skilled nursing care at home is both challenging and rewarding for the caregivers. Home care is a blessing for the patient. Having chosen to provide it, you deserve to congratulate yourself. To make this project more manageable, take advantage of the advice and the forms provided here. 

HOME FROM THE HOSPITAL

Someone you care deeply about is being released from the hospital, with the alternatives of home care, hospice care, or a nursing home. You have to decide, or help them decide, which alternative is best. If you decide on home care, you may need to manage it. This book will help you understand how to provide skilled nursing care at home and will aid in your decision-making.

As noted, the co-authors have been involved for over a decade in supplying and managing skilled nursing care at home for Tina Su Cooper (Cooper, 2011):
In June of 2004, when she came home from the Critical Care Unit after the 100 days that nearly killed her, Tina was on a ventilator, quadriplegic, fed through a gastric tube. Not only was she totally dependent on us for her care, the list of infections and problems that had developed while hospitalized was daunting. She had been “colonized” by two strains of hospital-acquired bacteria and given only months to live. She was safer at home or in a hospice than in the hospital, our doctors agreed.  Being given the choice of home or the hospice meant there was a good chance she had only months to live. She took it in stride.

Over a decade later, Tina’s health has remained strong, and even though the losses caused by multiple sclerosis have been severe, including quadriplegia, dependence on a ventilator and the need to be fed and medicated by a gastric tube, she has been able to live an added twelve years and generally enjoy her life at home.

We, the co-authors, have long thought it worthwhile to write a book about our experience, but only recently got down to doing it. Investigating what was available at mega-bookseller amazon.com, we found only one relevant entry when we queried “manage nursing care at home.” That book, How to Manage Family Illness at Home, which we will describe next, was written by a British author, Gill Pharaoh, published in paperback in 2004, re-issued as a Kindle e-book in 2015.
               
The chapter list for Ms. Pharaoh’s book is as follows:
     Chapter 1: Receiving the Diagnosis
     Chapter 2: Whom to Tell?
     Chapter 3: The Services of the Hospice and Palliative Care Team
     Chapter 4: Making Decisions about Work
     Chapter 5: How Much to Tell the Children?
     Chapter 6: Caring for the Carer
     Chapter 7: Looking at Ways in Which Everyone Can Help
     Chapter 8: The Physical Needs of the Person Who is Ill*
     Chapter 9: The Use of Aids and Appliances*
     Chapter 10: Some Common Symptoms and the Use of Medication
     Chapter 11: Physical Comfort, Health, and Safety for Everyone Involved
     Chapter 12: Children: Managing Change and Planning for the Future
     Chapter 13: Long-term Care: Unhappy Families and Mental Health
     Chapter 14: Acknowledging Anger
     Chapter 15: Dealing with Depression
     Chapter 16: The Question of Euthanasia
     Chapter 17: Dying at Home
     Chapter 18: Dying in the Hospital
     Chapter 19: The Effects of Bereavement
     Chapter 20: Supporting a Friend
     Chapter 21: Starting a New Life Alone

Ms. Pharaoh’s valuable book emphasizes the many significant psycho-social aspects of home care, and hospice care at home, two areas we are not going to explore in depth. Her two chapters that we have marked with asterisks cover topics similar to what is covered here, where we go into the “nuts and bolts” of managing nursing care for someone at home.

    A less restrictive search, for ebooks covering “nursing care at home,” gave the following titles:
·       Long Term Care: Everything You Need to Know about Long Term Care Nursing and How to Plan and Pay for Long Term Care and Insurance [2014]
·       Nursing Wild Birds for Release at Home: Booklet [2014]
·       Now and at the Hour of Our Death [2015]
·       American Cancer Society Complete Guide to Family Caregiving: The Essential Guide to Cancer Caregiving at Home [2012]
·       Keeping Your Mind While They’re Losing Theirs: A Sometimes Poignant Look at Dealing with a Parent who Has Alzheimer’s or Dementia [2015]
·       Five Ways to Pay for Home Healthcare and Stay in Your Home [2012]
·       AIDS Care at Home: A Guide for Caregivers, Loved Ones, and People with a AIDS  [1994]
·       Elder Care Activities: 105 Great Activities You Can Do at Home, in Assisted Living, a Retirement Community, or in a Nursing Home [2013]
·       Perspectives on Care at Home for Older People [2013]
·       Conscious Acts of Grace --- Gifts of Love and Kindness at the End of Life [2010]
·       Knocking on Heaven’s Door: The Path to a Better Way of Death [2013]
·       The Preemie Parents’ Companion: The Essential Guide to Caring for Your Premature Baby in the Hospital, at Home, and Through the First Years [2000]
·       Spiritual Midwifery [2002]
·       Keeley Meditation: Free Your Mind [2012]
·       The Complete Guide to Medicaid Nursing Home Costs: How to Keep Your Family Assets Protected – up to date Medicaid… [2008]
·       Comrades in Health: US. Health Internationalists, Abroad and at Home [2013]
·       Caregiver Relief: A Stress Management Guide [2013]
·       Seniors at Large [2012]
·       Cancer Caregiving A-to-Z: An At-home Guide for Patients and Families [2008]
·       Conversations at the Nursing Home: A Mother, a Daughter, and Alzheimer’s [2013]
·       Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of General Hospital Psychiatry [2010]
·       Angels at the Door [2014]
·       Caregiving Tips A-Z [2008]
·       Making Myself at Home in a Nursing Home [2012]
·       Supporting People with Dementia at Home: Challenges and Opportunities for the 21st Century [2012]
·       Jekel’s Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Preventive Medicine [2013]
·       A New Look at Community-Based Respite Programs: Utilization, Satisfaction, and Development [2014]
·       Waiting at the Gate: Creativity and Hope in the Nursing Home [2014]
·       How to Find Someone to Care for Your Aging Person at Home [2010]
·       Providing Good Care at Night for Older People: Practical Approaches for Use in Nursing and Care Homes [2011]

   Some of these books would be logical sources for more detailed information on topics that will be just touched on here. There were 40 results for the Amazon Kindle ebooks. Expanding the search to all books on amazon.com with the same “nursing care at home” topic gave 291 items. You will not suffer from a shortage of reading matter, if you wish.

   From the 40 titles listed above, we can make some distinctions about what our book does and does not cover: we cover nursing care for the chronically ill at home, including the elderly, but
·       not premature babies,
·       not end-of-life, hospice care,
·       not respite care for caregivers, and…unsurprisingly…
·       not nursing wild birds. 
  
   Those who want to explore topics not covered here are directed to some of the titles listed above, or the titles that come from a search that includes both printed and ebooks.
    
Subsequently, we became aware of an exceptionally complete treatise on home care, Tena L. Scallan’s excellent The Ultimate Compassionate Guide to Caregiving: A Simple Blueprint for Dealing with Today’s Healthcare Crisis Combined with Years of Wisdom and Sound Advice, published in 2015 and available in paperback and ebook formats from Amazon, a book which gives finely detailed advice on the non-medical care of patients in the home, advice which we summarize in our appendix, “Custodial Care at Home,” a book we urge our readers to obtain to supplement our own, which has more of a medical management emphasis. Similarly, in 2015 was published The Successful Caregiver’s Guide, by Rick Lauber (2015), particularly valuable for those who must move their loved ones to a care facility.

    We have organized the first part of our book along the lines of the traditional questions a journalist would ask, though in a somewhat different order: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?

    We will start with why.  As Stephen R. Covey advised in his The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, one should “start with the end in mind.”








Contact information:
Diane R. Beggin, RN
40 Sycamore Drive
Montgomery, NY 12549
http://managenursingcareathome.com


                                    ###

Available from Outskirts Press and from Amazon:

How to Manage Nursing Care at Home