Thursday, October 11, 2018

WHAT EVER HAPPENED...? Helpful Businesses



         
          Some of the businesses and names I've listed below, I've already mentioned in this book. Others are listed here for the first time. All of them have helped me in one way or another, and they deserve to be recognized for just that.
I deliberately listed them in random order (vs. my usual everything-has-to-be-alphabetical order) just to “mix it up” a bit. All of them are explained as to how they've helped me along the way, and I encourage you to patronize their business if possible; they deserve your support because they take care of others, besides selling their goods.
Rite-Aid Pharmacy's (on Flatbush Avenue in Kingston, NY) pharmacist Bob. He is incredibly gentle and listens very well. He's an excellent medical resource.
Adams Fairacre Farms' (in Kingston, NY) employees Rebecca, Amanda, and Paul. Rebecca helped me try to stay in touch with my family – by ordering flowers each year when hardly anyone kept in touch with me. She helped me write warm notes to them. Amanda is a very patient cashier with me (and others) when I'm very slow counting out my owed money. [And Paul is written about elsewhere here.]
Enzo's Ristorante and Pizza, in Kingston, NY. It not only has delicious food, but its restrooms are fabulously clean, and I could actually eat at this location when I was afraid of germs, because I saw how well they did with cleanliness. Taso and Lora Giannoulis’s ristorante is fabulous, and I highly encourage you to try out their excellent cuisine.
Another place that I was also able to eat at, because it is clean and serves yummy food is the Broadway Lights Diner, also in Kingston.  Litsa Chasin's diner is well worth a visit!
Stop & Shop [now TOPS] in Rhinebeck, NY. Several employees there helped me when I was at my absolute darkest time with the mysophobia. They witnessed the tons of items I purchased to “stay clean” with. Their eyes showed sympathy for a woman who arrived at their store week after week and spent thousands of dollars on the same items. One name that I remember is Tammy. Thanks to her, and all the others, for showing love and concern.
Ice Cream Castle in Kingston, NY. The owners, Sandy and Jay Juliano, took such good care of me when I would go through their drive-thru for chocolate milkshakes. They learned, when they first opened, that my shakes had to be thin or I couldn't suck them through a straw (part of the left side of my face is partially paralyzed). Every time I was there with Aiden and Happy, all of the coworkers knew how to take care of me. Sweetness there wasn't just in their ice cream! [Sadly, this business is for sale. So, I found another place that does the same for me. It’s called Zoe’s Ice Cream Barn in LaGrangeville, NY. Its food and ice cream are delicious, and this distant restaurant takes care of this customer’s thin-milkshake request each time.]
Red Hook, NY's “Historic” Village Diner has wait staff that took such good care of me when I was sick, told me they prayed for me, and after my surgery, they were all thrilled to see me come back. My first meal with my parents after they traveled from Florida by train to help care for me after my brain surgery was at this diner with friends. P. S. Their daily specials are delicious.      [Some of the magnets attached above the window where the waitresses order our food to the cooks in the kitchen were donated by me from my classrooms.]
Lisa Smith – haircutter extraordinaire. When I first met her, she worked at JC Penney's in Kingston, NY. She styled my hair nicely after some of it was shaved off for the surgery. Since that store has closed, I now go to see her at C & C's Hair Salon in the Hudson Valley Mall. She's a sweetheart, and I love my appointments with her.
Waitress Susi Santa Anna who helped me in different diners (and at my church's women's Bible studies) – just by her kindness and thoughtfulness.
Lotus – a wonderful store in Woodstock, NY. The owner that I met (Jamie) is so gentle and helpful. I would like her “style” even if I didn't adore her mother (my friend Suzi). Jamie's shop sells signs, jewelry, chandeliers, pottery, cards, spa items, candles, and many other home accessories. Some of those signs are part of my collection. I have gone there when I get some time to “breathe.” [And a specific story about Jamie is elsewhere here.]
The Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union's Irma L. She was so kind and patient with me when I would become completely overwhelmed at the bank counter when I couldn't handle money very well at all. She took it nice and slow with me so I could leave with my transactions completed correctly. As many people became (and still become) impatient with me because I forget to do something necessary, Irma always just smiled and helped me get it done.
Pillow Talk owner Aleda Stamboulian of Saugerties, NY. She creates unique pillowcases. Of course, I've purchased her Mickey Mouse ones, but she has quite the variety! She sells at various craft fairs and probably at other places too. I used her pillowcases a lot when I was going for neurofeedback and QEEGs because of the sloppy stuff put in my hair to watch my brain waves. I'd come home exhausted and would plop down on my pillow with yucky hair. When I woke up, I'd take off the pillowcase that specifically matched the sheets and put on one of Aleda's, so when I went to bed later on after I washed my hair, I'd have a fun, clean pillowcase to sleep on.
Krause's Chocolates in Saugerties and/or Rhinebeck, NY. Chocolate is so comforting, and theirs is the best!
Bear Cave Gifts [Great signs!]
Duck Tape Jax [A young girl, Jaxon-Lily, “duck-tape artist,” made me a beautiful Mickey-Mouse-themed duck tape wallet that I decided to use for my business cards.]
Two other young girls (who are friends) have businesses also. Hannah makes dog and cat treats (and my dog, Happy, loves her peanut butter and bacon pig-shaped treats) and Hannah’s friend Ashley makes homemade soaps (my favorite is her Hollyberry).
Way to go, all three of you young ladies!

Art in Heaven (Ruth and Joe Breitenbach): this husband and wife team creates the coolest jewelry – earrings, pins, and more. I used to buy from them at craft fairs I attended long ago when I still taught, to wear to school. Nowadays, I still buy adorable earrings just for fun. Here are some of my favorite earrings: fortune cookies, hamburger with fries, sandwiches, doggie paw prints, popcorn, donuts, pizza, hot dogs, pencil with eraser, bacon strips, monkeys, bubbles, ducks, lighthouses, cameras, garlic cloves, lollipops, and so much more. Wearing them reminds me of teaching days gone by.
Some may think it's silly that a grown woman wears these fun earrings outside of a classroom setting, but I don't care. And once, when I was at the Dutchess County Fair in Rhinebeck, NY, a former, retired kindergarten teacher was doing the same thing – purchasing earrings from Ruth and Joe that she will no longer wear to school, but will enjoy wearing out and about like me. She and I smiled and chatted about missing teaching so much. Those of you still in the classroom – remember, someday it will be all over for you too. Get through the stress of it to have fun helping your kiddies enjoy learning.
Panera Bread in Kingston, NY, was so very helpful with me when it first opened, and I was at the worst time of my life with the mysophobia. I'm not good with names from back then, but I do remember a female manager and another employee (Pam?), who helped me touch money and keep me calm when I ordered and then ate my food. Helping a customer's fear of germs was probably not in their job descriptions, but they did it very well. For that, I'm truly grateful.
I used to go to the Village Apothecary in Woodstock, NY, to purchase lots of items to help me remain as calm as possible after my brain was injured. An employee, Josh, couldn't have been more helpful. I explained to him what was going on with me, and he'd direct me to try this or that. Everything he recommended helped in the ways I needed it to. He was an absolutely excellent employee, and I wish him well wherever he works nowadays.
Go to the local soup sales near you. Their homemade, delicious soups (and desserts sometimes, too) are so enjoyable. Church meals, too, are often yummy!
Computer Gear & More: Fun Stuff for Your Tech Buff  [This is a catalog I order some of my best, most-talked-about T-shirts that I wear often. Though I stink at computers, I love the catalog's selection of grammatical sayings. They're funny, yet get their point across.]
Hallmark [The stores, TV programs, and movies are excellent! I love attending the early morning shopping sprees when it's time to buy their Keepsake ornaments. It disappoints me when people trash that wonderful company.]
This example is not a business per se but it's about an employee at the doctor's office, and she is worth a mention here: Her name is Haley Andrews, and I met her at my gynecologist's office. These appointments are never enjoyable, but for me they are very upsetting, as I sit in a waiting room with happy pregnant women, and little ones running around with their parents supervising, and me, not a mommy or a grandma-to-be ever. I pretty much feel sorry for myself that my life turned out different than for the majority of women.

And that's where Haley comes in. Instead of coldness, she exudes warmth. Instead of treating me like just another patient, she makes me feel welcome. Too many receptionists forget how to be nice to the person waiting to see the doctor. They could learn a thing or two from Haley. [I was sad to learn she has changed jobs. Whatever business she has joined, they are lucky to have her.]
         
Back when I was so sick with the tumor, there were many times I could not fill out forms correctly. Something as simple as an envelope at Target to mail away my film to be developed (remember when we did that?), I couldn’t even remember my own last name or phone number.
          There was this sweet, young girl who worked there, named Kristel, who helped me each and every time I went in. It must have been strange that someone as young as I was (mid-40s) could not state such simple information about herself. But, she helped me gently each time.
          Fast-forward to late fall, 2016. I saw Kristel’s picture in the local paper with her husband, Craig, and their baby daughter, Leah.
          Leah was born with multiple health issues. The expenses for all of her medical help were astronomical. So, a hair salon was holding a fundraiser to help with their mounting medical bills.
          As soon as I read this touching story in the early morning the day it was in the paper, I remembered how sweet this young woman was to me years ago, though she was just doing her job at that store. She did it with such kindness!
          I decided to pray all day about it. After praying, I decided: If my book does well, I’m going to donate a large portion of the profits to this family.
          This is a way to repay this one young woman’s kindness towards a store customer.
Her kindness to me created a ripple effect. Can you help someone who has helped you, even if it was long ago? Food for thought….

So, I’m quite sure that there were many other businesses that have helped me, some I probably even told that I’d write about them someday. Here are the ones I remembered, or scribbled down before I forgot their help. Thank you, all, for making my “now life” a bit cheerier.




For the coming year, I (Douglas Winslow Cooper) will be 
excerpting, weekly, material from this almost-final version of the fine book by Janet Johnson Schliff, M.S. Ed., which she wrote over a three-year period with some coaching and editing help from me, through my business, Write Your Book with Me.

Her memoir is now available in paperback and ebook formats from Outskirts Press  and amazon.com

What Ever Happened to My White Picket Fence? My Brain Injury from My Massive Brain Tumor



                                              ###

BOOK TALKS AND SIGNINGS



Janet Johnson Schliff spoke at the Oblong Books Bookstore in Rhinebeck, NY, on Tuesday, February 6 at 6 p.m.

Janet was on WKNY Radio 1490 in Kingston, NY, on Thursday, March 1 at 9:10 a.m. 

Janet spoke at Barnes & Noble in Kingston, NY, on Saturday, March 3 at 1 p.m. 

Janet spoke at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on March 6 
at 7 p.m. 

Janet spoke at the Golden Notebook Bookstore in Woodstock, NY, on March 17 at 2 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Morton Library in Rhinecliff, NY, on March 28 at 6:30 p.m. 

Janet spoke at RCAL in Kingston, NY, on April 3 at 4 p.m. [They gave her an impromptu book-launch party.]

Janet spoke at the Parkinson's Support Group at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on April 4 at 2:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Stone Ridge Library in Stone Ridge, NY, on April 27 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Hurley Library in Hurley, NY, on May 4 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Kingston Library in Kingston, NY, on May 9 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Staatsburg Library in Staatsburg, NY, on May 14 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Clinton Community Library in Rhinebeck, NY, on May 31 at 6:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Mountain Top Library in Tannersville, NY, on June 9 at noon.

Janet spoke at the Gardiner Library in Gardiner, NY, on June 11 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Marbletown Community Center in Stone Ridge, NY, on June 20 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Esopus Library in Port Ewen, NY, on July 13 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Pine Plains Library in Pine Plains, NY, on July 20 at 6 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Ulster Library in Kingston, NY, on July 23 at 5:30 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Northern Dutchess Bible Church in Red Hook, NY, on August 11 at 1 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Inquiring Minds Bookstore in New Paltz, NY, on September 6 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Adriance Library in Poughkeepsie, NY, on September 15 at 2:30 p.m.

Janet was interviewed on radio station WRIP-FM (97.9) on September 21 at 8 a.m.

Janet again spoke at the Mountain Top Library in Tannersville, NY, on September 22 at noon.

Janet spoke at the Enchanted Cafe in Red Hook, NY, on September 28 at 7 p.m.

Janet spoke at the Hyde Park Library in Hyde Park, NY, on October 4 at 7 p.m.

Janet participated in an Author Weekend at the Barnes & Noble in Poughkeepsie, NY, on October 14 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Janet will be speaking at the Tivoli Library in Tivoli, NY, on October 22 at 5:30 p.m.


Janet will be speaking at the Westchester Medical Center for a "Lunch and Learn" on November 2.

Janet will be speaking at the Germantown Library in Germantown, NY, on November 7 at 6:00 p.m.


More signings will be coming up. A fine feature about Janet by John DeSantos [845 LIFE] appeared in the Middletown Times Herald-Record on Monday, March 12, as part of Brain Injury Awareness Month. An article about her book was just published in the May 2018 Living Rhinebeck Magazine. An article about her book appeared in the May 14 Daily Freeman of Kingston, NY. and another in the Family Life section of the Poughkeepsie Journal on June 8th. The Millerton News published an article on Thursday, August 2, about her talk at the Pine Plains Library. Also, a national TV interview is being planned.

MONETIZE YOUR SPEAKING


Summary of a talk by
David Newman for BusinessSuccess.com on 9 October 2018

Newman spent three years going broke, another three improving, and finally, since 2009, he has learned how to start 7-figure businesses.

First, you must avoid some common errors.
1.    Don’t be a grocery-bag speaker. Must have specific area of expertise.
2.    Must establish a unique identity within your niche.
3.    Must avoid the tendency to form partnerships from hell.
4.    Sit in the chair of the buyer, get in his mind.

You need a system; then take baby steps within it.

Public speaking is a plus factor: more leads, prospects, sales.

Seven key elements:
1.    Strategy: go beyond a speech; solve problems; foster change
2.    Packaging: develop a brand; expertise and enthusiasm; excellence
3.    Focus: solve urgent problems: action: smarter-better-faster
4.    Prospects: list details of 20 groups you want to speak to
5.    Outreach: use “referral blurb”: short, relevant to them; write articles
6.    Sales: low price=assumed inferior; $5000 speech is the sweet spot
7.    Leverage: get others to help; make one thing boost another
Missing any one of these leads to failure.

Go beyond being a keynote speaker, become a trainer / consultant for continuing involvement with the clients.

Golden triangle:
1.    Speaking
2.    Training
3.    Consulting/coaching
You can rotate through these three elements with your clients.

Four free referral templates are at http://GiftFromDavid.com

His training and marketing programs: http://doitmarketing.com

His book and valuable reviews: Do It! by David Newman, at amazon.com .



Monday, October 8, 2018

MANAGE NURSING CARE AT HOME, Foreword



Let whoever is in charge keep this simple question in her head: not, how can I always do this right thing myself, but how can I provide for this right thing to be always done?”

Emperor Marcus Aurelius is one of my favorite authors. Living during a time when the world was constantly at war, disease was rampant, and there was a great deal of human suffering, the Emperor, a stoic, believed in self-restraint. He also lived with the knowledge that the decisions he made would impact the lives of millions of people.

Marcus Aurelius firmly believed that wisdom was obtained by examining oneself, so he took time to journal his private thoughts each night as a method of personal improvement. His philosophical reflections were never intended to be shared with the public; rather, they were his true and visceral responses to what he was experiencing, and a free expression of frustrations associated with the challenges he faced daily as a person with many flaws.

His once-private meditations continue to be relevant to coping with challenges we humans encounter two thousand years later. Marcus Aurelius did not set out to be an author, yet his published works highlight the importance of sharing your wisdom.

In How to Manage Nursing Care at Home, authors Douglas Winslow Cooper and Diane R. Beggin, address one of the most complex global issues faced in the 21st century: caring for someone you love, one who is also diagnosed with a severe medical condition, doing this safely, and in the home.

The truth is that there is no easy way to address the immense fiscal and logistical barriers that must be considered as you take on the responsibility for providing nursing-level care at home. I can personally attest to the challenges associated with ensuring that a loved one safely receives full-time complex medical care–24 hours a day, seven days a week–for an indefinite period of time.

As a registered nurse and the co-founder of Caregiver Support Services, a non-profit organization that exists to improve the health and wellbeing of both family and professional caregivers, I have dedicated my life to improving the circumstances of the elderly and their caregivers.

I am also a caregiver for my mother-in-law, Emma. Earlier this year, she was infected with a virulent strain of influenza, was placed on a ventilator, went into a medically induced a coma, and suffered a stroke. We didn’t know if she would survive. Mom has since transitioned to a rehabilitation center to receive therapy, but our goal is to bring her home.

A major barrier to Mom’s transition to home is coordinating the complex care that she needs.  One of our biggest concerns is that Mom wakes up three or more times each night to urinate, but she can’t remember that she is unable to walk to the bathroom safely on her own. So, when she tries to stand up from bed, she often falls. In fact, my husband and I receive a call from the rehab center once or twice a week reporting that Mom has fallen. This repetitive circumstance is heartbreaking.

Waking up multiple times a night has led to decreased daytime functioning for Mom, and even more concerning, to anxiety and depression. These additional issues have made it extremely challenging to engage her in the recovery therapies necessary for her to return home. In fact, we meet regularly with the staff and the doctors to modify her anxiety and depression medications to help her achieve the highest level of functioning.

We want to bring Mom home, but we are physically and emotionally overwhelmed. Our biggest concern is pulling together everything needed to make the transition safely. In fact, just the thought of trying to figure out where to start to gather the resources that we will need to bring her home has been downright stressful. This book addresses such issues.

Dr. Cooper includes firsthand experiences associated with caring for his wife, Tina, who is quadriplegic, on a ventilator, and suffers from multiple sclerosis. Together they have overcome tremendous obstacles, yet because of Dr. Cooper’s advocacy and with the help of her head nurse, Diane R. Beggin, Tina is lovingly being cared for in her home.

What likely began as a way to cope and to document his very personal experience with caring for Tina has been nurtured and is now a valuable guide that will ease your worry as you begin your journey as one of the millions of untrained family caregivers who want to safely provide complex medical care services so that your loved one can remain home.

I know that this text has helped my family with starting the process to bring Mom home. In fact, these distinguished authors go a step further than most books written about caregiving, as they address both the emotional and navigational aspects of caring for someone you love.

I am honored to have gotten to know Tina, Dr. Cooper, and Tina’s nurse, Diane Beggin, through reading their very personal experience of providing complex care in the home. Like Marcus Aurelius, the authors of this important work have openly shared their wisdom so that you do not have to face the immense challenges associated with caregiving alone.

I leave you with this final thought,

Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers. It may not be difficult to store up in the mind a vast quantity of facts within a comparatively short time, but the ability to form judgments requires the severe discipline of hard work and the tempering heat of experience and maturity.2

The care of your loved one will require planning and the continuous acquisition of knowledge to ensure all needs are being met, including your own.  Juggling all of the challenges will likely be difficult, yet this useful contribution to caregiving highlights your intangible contributions as a part of the healthcare infrastructure.

I hope that you will take advantage of the wisdom shared in the pages that follow, that you are empowered to use this material to make your life easier, and that you continue to seek additional learning opportunities as your caregiving situation changes.

Eboni I. Green, PhD, RN
Co-Founder of Caregiver Support Services


1Florence Nightingale. Retrieved on October 17, 2016 from http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/63031.Florence_Nightingale
2Calvin Coolidge. BrainyQuote.com, Xplore Inc., 2016. https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/c/calvincool156506.html, accessed October 24, 2016.



Available from Outskirts Press and from Amazon:

How to Manage Nursing Care at Home



                                                                                                            


              

Thursday, October 4, 2018

WHAT EVER HAPPENED...? Holistic Treatments






          I received much help from various people whose professions aided me in calming down, behaving more appropriately, and becoming less agitated. That’s not to claim that I’m all better. I have a long way to go as far as appropriate behavior. But I have made headway.

          One person who has been treating me every three-four weeks, and I so enjoy what she’s brought to my life is Debbie Burklund, my reflexologist. She works for no less than one and a half hours each session (and many times longer than that) to help “ground” me. Instead of the stereotypical psychiatrist’s fifty-minute “hour,” I get this reflexologist’s generous ninety-minute “hour.” Debbie listens to whatever is upsetting me, and then she does her thing: not only manipulating my feet but also physically massaging my cranium. Debbie is one of the best listeners I’ve ever met. Also, she detected a liver problem that I had and helped me remember to contact my doctors about. I will be eternally grateful to her for all she’s done for me, including accompanying me to someone else’s court sessions.

According to Lauren Yanks of the Poughkeepsie Journal, “Reflexology is considered an alternative health treatment that links each organ in the body with an area on the foot – and sometimes the hand, face and ears as well. Massaging these specific areas helps to unblock the body's energy and heal the specific corresponding organ.”

Ms. Yanks quotes Debbie Burklund: “Reflexology is so very effective, and I can influence somebody's health so quickly,” she said. “When there's disorder in your body, it forms metabolic waste in the reflexes. My job is to remove waste so your body can heal itself. It also happens to feel really wonderful.” [Yes, it does!]

          Another health field that has helped me enormously is neurofeedback. This helper’s name is Debbie Burdick. She calls herself, “The Brain Lady,” and that is so very accurate. I worked with T.B.L. at a couple of different locations, and even though they were quite a distance to drive to from my home, those appointments were well worth the trips.

          The Brain Lady hooked my head up to what I referred to as her “bells and whistles.” She had to put gunk into my hair so that her electrodes would stick to my head to read my brain waves. I had to stare at computer images, then report different things.

Dr. Norman Doidge has some excellent quotes in his book The Brain's Way of Healing (that I've written about in my recommended books and literature chapter). Here are some of his neurofeedback quotes:
·       “Neurofeedback…trains a person whose brain rhythms are off to control them. So, it is excellent for people with…a noisy brain in general.”
·       “Neurofeedback is a sophisticated form of biofeedback…. It also has been approved for the treatment of…many other conditions, including…brain injuries…. It is a neuroplastic treatment but is not better known because it was pioneered before neuroplasticity was widely understood.” [I attempted to make politicians in NYS aware of it when I spoke to them in the fall of 2015 at a hearing (see appendix).]
·       “A conventional neurofeedback session involves hooking a person up to an EEG, a noninvasive way to detect brain waves, then displaying the waves on a computer screen.”
·       “A quantitative EEG (QEEG) is a test that can indicate if a patient has a 'noisy brain.' This study is often done by advanced neurofeedback practitioners, and must be interpreted by an expert who has actually met with the patient, not simply run the information through a machine.” [I have a “lovely” picture of myself in my pictures section of this book, having one of the QEEGs I had done after my surgery.]

          It’s all mumbo-jumbo to me, but suffice it to say: it worked! I always felt better after time spent with The Brain Lady. Like my other Debbie in this chapter (is there something special about that name?), she helped me deal better with society. During the time I spent with T.B.L., I went to a couple of specialists for QEEGs (“brain mappings”). When the results of these tests were shared with specialists to analyze my condition, these doctors were shocked that I was as high-functioning as I am, given the brain damage I have suffered.

          One specialist asked if I had been arrested or had a drug or alcohol problem after the brain injury. He was told no, though I have to admit that I have at times “talked” to police officers…but luckily, I was able to calm down.

          Another specialist said that from the damage I had, he was surprised that I wasn’t in a nursing home. When he looked at my brain’s image on his computer, he said, “Wow!” I asked him if that was a “good wow” or a “bad wow.” He replied it was a “good wow” and said I must be a fighter. I told him he didn’t know the half of it!

Another therapy that helped me was Craniosacral Therapy. For this I saw Heidi Washburn, and she was excellent at helping me to relax. To and from her Bearsville, NY, appointments, I had to drive through Woodstock, NY. On my way to see her, I felt quite stressed driving through that very busy little village. On my way back, after therapy, I smiled and enjoyed the unconventional sights one only sees when visiting that unique community.

          Heidi Washburn describes her therapy as follows: “Craniosacral Therapy is a gentle hands-on technique that works with the nervous system to help release restrictions that impede a person’s ability to function fully. We focus specifically on the soft tissue, fluids and membranes affecting the sacrum, spinal cord and brain…. Because of the positive effect on the nervous system, Craniosacral Therapy is particularly helpful for diseases and injuries of the brain, as well as PTSD and traumatic brain injury.”

          The only negative aspect of these non-traditional services is that they are not cheap, and they are not covered by insurance. At this writing, I have spent most of my life’s savings on techniques to help me chill out. This is what I reported to those politicians at that hearing in October of 2015. The treatments are worth every penny, but when you’re on disability support, you need money for extra things, and so I tapped and tapped and tapped some more into the savings I had accumulated since my first job in 1977.

          To diverge a bit, that first job was when I was sixteen. I worked at Four Brothers Pizza Inn, in Rhinebeck, NY. I also worked at a restaurant named “The Fox Hollow Inn.” Then I worked at the Greig Farm in Red Hook. Mr. and Mrs. Greig were very sweet to me. I picked berries, worked the check-out line, and served as their granddaughters’ nanny sometimes. I even lived in their house with them one summer. To this day, I put syrup on my strawberries and blueberries, eating them just as Mr. Greig taught me to, so many years ago.

          The money from these jobs as well as my earnings from being a teacher are unfortunately long gone now, but I knew I had to do something to get grounded if I were to make anything of myself after the life-changing brain injury I suffered.

          I want to wrap up this chapter with two excellent quotes from my FAVORITE brain expert, Dr. Marian Diamond:

          “Never learn bitterness, because you are the only one who suffers.”

          “What plasticity reveals is that we are the masters of our own minds. That each one of us, as individuals, has the potential to change our brains, to become the person we want to be. What we do, day to day, minute to minute, grows and builds our brain. What a gift, and what a responsibility as we literally create our personal masterpiece – our mature brain.”

          Thank you to everyone in this chapter who has helped me feel better.

          [And, I have to add that a generous woman named Ann Capozzoli taught me, and a group of other people, meditation practices, at the Kingston Library. Then, she even came to my house, for free, to help me learn how to calm myself down when I became unusually agitated, at the beginning of my recovery. Thank you, Ann!]



For the coming year, I (Douglas Winslow Cooper] will be 
excerpting, weekly, material from this almost-final version of the fine book by Janet Johnson Schliff, M.S. Ed., which she wrote over a three-year period with some coaching and editing help from me, through my business, Write Your Book with Me.

Her memoir is now available in paperback and ebook formats from Outskirts Press  and amazon.com

What Ever Happened to My White Picket Fence? My Brain Injury from My Massive Brain Tumor



                                              ###

BOOK TALKS AND SIGNINGS

Janet Johnson Schliff was on WKNY  Radio 1490 at 9:10 a.m. on Thursday, March 1, Kingston, NY.

Janet spoke at 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 3 at Barnes & Noble in Kingston, NY. I [DWC] attended, along with about 40 other people. Congratulations to Janet on a fine talk!

Janet Johnson Schliff spoke at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, NY, at 7 p.m. on March 6. 

She spoke at the Golden Notebook Bookstore in Woodstock, NY, at 2 p.m. on March 17. 

She spoke at the Morton Library in Rhinecliff, NY, at 6:30 p.m. on March 28. 

She spoke at RCAL in Kingston, NY, at 4 p.m. on April 3. I was able to attend. They gave her an impromptu book-launch party.

On 4/4/18 Janet spoke at the Parkinson's Support Group at the Starr Library at Rhinebeck at 2:30 p.m.

On 4/27/18 Janet spoke at the Stone Ridge Library at 5:30 p.m.

On 5/4/18 Janet spoke at the Hurley Library at 6 p.m.

On 5/9/18 Janet spoke at the Kingston Library at 6 p.m.

On 5/14/18 Janet spoke at the Staatsburg Library at 7 p.m.

On 5/31/18 Janet spoke at the Clinton Community Library at 6:30 p.m.

On 6/9/18 Janet spoke at the Tannersville Mountain Top Library at noon.

On 6/11/18 Janet spoke at the Gardiner Library at 7 p.m.

On 6/20/18 Janet spoke at the Marbletown Community Center at 6 p.m.

On 7/13/18 Janet spoke at the Esopus Library at 7 p.m.

On 7/20/18 Janet spoke at the Pine Plains Library at 6 p.m.

On 7/23/18 Janet spoke at the Ulster Library at 5:30 p.m.

On 8/11/18 Janet spoke at the Northern Dutchess Bible Church in Red Hook at 1:00 p.m.

On 9/06/18 Janet spoke at the Inquiring Minds Bookstore in New Paltz at 7 p.m.

On 9/15/18 Janet spoke at the Adriance Library in Poughkeepsie (93 Market St.) at 2:30 p.m.

On 9/21/18 Janet was interviewed on the radio at station WRIP-FM (97.9) at 8 a.m.

On 9/22/18 Janet again spoke at the Tannersville Mountain Top Library, at noon.

On 9/28/18 Janet spoke at the Enchanted Cafe in Red Hook at 7 p.m.

On 10/04/18 Janet spoke at the Hyde Park Library at 7 p.m.

On 10/14/18 Janet will be participating in an Author Weekend at the Barnes & Noble in Poughkeepsie from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

On 10/22/18 Janet will be speaking at the Tivoli Library in Tivoli at 5:30 p.m.

On 11/07/18 Janet will be speaking at the Germantown Library in Germantown at 6:00 p.m.


More signings will be coming up. A fine feature about Janet by John DeSantos [845 LIFE] appeared in the Middletown Times Herald-Record on Monday, March 12, as part of Brain Injury Awareness Month. An article about her book was just published in the May 2018 Living Rhinebeck Magazine. An article about her book appeared in the May 14 Daily Freeman of Kingston, NY. and another in the Family Life section of the Poughkeepsie Journal on June 8th. The Millerton News published an article on Thursday, August 2, about her talk at the Pine Plains Library.